take French leave

take French leave
to take time away from your job without asking for permission

English dictionary. 2014.

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take French leave — 1. To depart without notice or permission 2. To disappear suspiciously • • • Main Entry: ↑French * * * take French leave phrase to take time away from your job without asking for permission Thesaurus: time off from workhyponym …   Useful english dictionary

  • take French leave — {v. phr.} To leave secretly; abscond. * /The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave./ * /While the Smith family was in Europe, the house sitter packed up all the silver and took French leave./ See: SLIP AWAY …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take French leave — {v. phr.} To leave secretly; abscond. * /The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave./ * /While the Smith family was in Europe, the house sitter packed up all the silver and took French leave./ See: SLIP AWAY …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ French\ leave — v. phr. To leave secretly; abscond. The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave. While the Smith family was in Europe, the house sitter packed up all the silver and took French leave. See: slip away …   Словарь американских идиом

  • take french leave — Depart informally, take leave unceremoniously …   New dictionary of synonyms

  • take French leave — verb a) To leave unannounced b) to desert. to go AWOL Syn: abscond, AWOL …   Wiktionary

  • french leave — To take French leave is to leave a gathering without saying goodbye or without permission …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • French leave — n. (obsol.) leaving without saying goodbye to take French leave * * * (obsol.) [ leaving without saying goodbye ] to take French leave (obsol.) [ leaving without saying goodbye ] to take French leave …   Combinatory dictionary

  • French leave —    If you leave an official or social event without notifying the person who invited you, you take French leave.     Is Bill coming back for the closing speech or has he taken French leave? …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • French leave —    unauthorized absence    Originally of a soldier, implying a propensity in French soldiers for desertion. Some civilian and figurative use:     We could still, if we wished, take French leave of Vietnam. (M. McCarthy, 1967) …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

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